About your Search

20121108
20121116
STATION
CSPAN2 9
CSPAN 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
CNBC 3
CNN 3
CNNW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implicatns. wouljust argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a jugul
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
time from a foreign policy standpoint to have petraeus out. scandals that are taking key players out of afghanistan, syrian discussions. country that the president has a lot going on right now. >> we were joking coming in that you have to stare at your blackberry because every five minutes something new happens. the one familiar aspect of the david petraeus scandal is that he had an affair. everything else about this story is weird, in the washington post. >> i was going to see skyfall this weekend. i'm going to stay at home and read the sunday times. this is totally bizarre. there's so much that we don't know, this fbi investigator. not just four people. there's an fbi and cia, infa infatuated with jill kelley >> let's get this straight. this guy works at the fbi, becomes infatuated. she gets shirtless photos of him allegedly. she goes to him and says i'm getting these weird e-mails. >> he takes this matter into a federal investigation you have to wonder. an fbi investigation if not for this one agent's involvement and especially him going to congress as a whistle blower saying it w
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shifted emphasis of u.s. policy to the asia-pacific. that reduced the significance of europe's importance. do you think we will see the same? >> absolutely. given the inward looking mode of u.s. society, given the financial constraints of the u.s., there is no alternative. the crucial question is -- will the europeans deliver? can they deliver in terms of financial contributions to international crisis managemen
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. [ forsythe ] we don't just come up here for the view up in alaska. it's the cleanest, clearest water. we find the best sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. [ male announcer ] hur
.0 with respect to our foreign policy on israel and iran? because you had been sounding alarm bells about how the sanctions weren't going to do it, iran is moving towards a nuclear bomb, and if we don't step up the sanctions severely or do something else, you know, they're going to wind up with a nuke, or israel's going to act militarily? where do you see us now? >> well, i don't think anything has changed just because of our election on tuesday. i think the most likely outcome in the middle east remains that iran will get nuclear weapons unless israel or the united states acts militarily. i see zero chance the obama administration will do that, so people are necessarily concentrating on israel. i think president obama will put merciless pressure on israel not to use military force. i think he will try to affect the outcome of the israeli election in january and do what he can to make sure netanyahu's not reelected. that could include a very public discussion with iran bilaterally, it could include behind-the-scenes pressure. but i think the stakes are very high here. megyn: i want to talk to
are seeing now is an openly pro-russian policy. even if we do here critical voices now and again, our foreign policy is aimed at catering to the russians and the lukashenko regime. >> the economicrisis frothe lithuanians firms to seek new markets, and they found them in belarus. m a lithuanian business enjoys carte blanche in belarus. managers have no trouble getting necessary permits and with very favorable conditions, but that can come to an end quickly if for example their assets are seas. >> asylum seekers are considered a nuisance when it comes to business relations, especially a deserter from a special forces unit. he has successfully challenged the order to deport him, however. his application for asylum had not been properly considered, the court ruled. lithuanian authorities now have six months to compile a new assessment. >> his situation is not hopeless. first, we know he is here. we have been able to support him in recent weeks and hoped to publicize his case. the lithuanian media have been covering this story. >> that means the autriti see him differently. i really hope he gets a
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
in recent foreign- policy history is on tv defending david petraeus without actually addressing the real problems with the petraeus' record. those are the fact he manipulated the white house about afghanistan, ran a campaign in iraq there was brutally savage including the worst of the worse, sunni militiamen, shiite death squads. then you go back to the training of the iraqi army that had similar problems. for me, all the while he is going around the country talking about honor and integrity. >> that was michael hastings speaking on piers morgan. >> i think michael hastings is a fascinating case he wrote a cover story about general mcchrystal on "the rolling stone" who ended general mcchrystal's career. what was amazing is nobody doubted the authenticity of the quotes included in this article, yet huge numbers of the most prominent media figures who covered the war in afghanistan attack michael hastings facetiously -- attacked michael hastings viciously, accusing him of violating the trust of the general. not because he reported things that are supposed to be off the record, but they say
consumption led growth model. >> and is it going to comatethe perhaps its biggest and foreign policy challenge will be the middle east, is going to potentially be iran? >> absolutely. what can we do make them be more constructive there, not support iran, but to lead to a change there. >> phil, thanks for that. he's written loads of books. let's show where you we stand with the u.s. futures right now ahead of this particular market. right new pretty flat the open for the s&p 500. the nasdaq is around five points above fair value and at the moment, we are five points below fair value for the dow. so looks fairly flat. european stocks down most of the session. bond yeeds certainyields certai looking at. >> if we look at the bond space, we can get a sense of why the italian ten year, this is the one to watch breaching the 5% level today. it has come down a little bit from the session high. perhaps indicating something of a floor below the market levels that we're seeing this morning. but certainly one to watch as we continue to gauge fallout across the eurozone as to whether greece ahead of budget
in their programming ucla. our coverage begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern followed by a speech on foreign policy. this'll be his third time speaking since becoming prime minister. then later, be no rennae talks about social enterprise. -- bono talks about social and a price. host: we want to welcome the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele welcome back to c-span. what happened tuesday guest: i think from the democrats perspective they got an affirmation of the policies and the direction that the president articulated. as a i would say there wasn't much articulation there but they showed they are spoir in getting their vote to the table and with the pick up in the senate i think a lot of people kind of looked at the senate as one of those fire walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. and it really makes the policy discussion take on a very different hugh than it otherwise would. and i think for the republicans it was one of those come to jesus 340e789s politically where they have to reassess and evaluate whether they want to be a relevant p
of course continuously focused on his foreign policy and national security agenda. he has great confidence in the acting cia director, confidence in his military and the second of defense and the defense department to carry out the missions that he's assigned to them. but he's got obviously a lot that he wants to get to work on and he's doing that this week. >> broadly, how does this affect the national security team? >> i think these are specific questions about specific individuals and posts. i can say now, even though you haven't asked, i have no announcemented to make with regards to personnel and no speculation to engage in. i can tell you that the president has not made a decision on personnel matters and you will not hear me discuss them until the president has made those decisions and has announced them. >> regarding two specific people you can't extrapolate but two of the president's top military brass either involved in an extramarital affair or inappropriate behavior. is the president worried about a culture, inappropriate culture in the military? >> i really would ask you to no
to foreign policy. years later he told her he can enter in a series of interviews that pat always handled herself very properly, even the sensitive diplomatic conversation that she might inadvertently overhear. he explained that she listened and nodded but never me, sever him. at the same time, he relied on the thing he did not because i think that it was very observant. a small diplomatic tasks also provided nixon with cover it demanded more of a government policy. she was a woman he could trust to do what he expected to do. traveling did more than desired or adventure of visiting new places. it was way of reconnecting with the husband. she had never been more a part of his life and work them when they travel together traina vice presidential years. certainly circumstances have changed. now they travel the huge entourage and feeling towards the u.s. hardened over the year. the ability demonstrated by the blindness by yourself must've got a fighter. in 1970, epitomized her value as a foreign ambassador. 1970 and earthquake measuring 7.75 on the wreck or scale devastated parts of peru, kil
foreign policy with interest in genocide and development, she faced scrutiny from september 15 when she appeared on five sunday shows pressing narrative of the benghazi attacks since discounted as false. >> does the president have confidence of ambassador susan rice that she can pass confirmation for any post in future cabinet? >> i will not engage in speculation about the personnel matters. the president believes ambassador rice has done an excellent job. and is grateful for her service. ♪ >> reporter: the white house also floated the idea of senator john kerry, the 2004 democratic presidential nominee and current chairman of the foreign relations committee serving as defense secretary. vietnam veteran who turned against the war he famously threw away medals he was awarded and would have confirmed being in position of awarding medals today. >> there would be significant concerns along the lines that you raised about senator kerry as secretary of defense. >> he would be a great addition to president's cabinet, whether defense department or the state department. but i have known him si
from the increasingly vocal feminists who demanded more of a role in government policy. she was a woman he could trust to do only what he expected her to do. pat's foreign traveling did more than feed her desire for a venture visiting new places, it was a way of reconnecting with her husband and the team of old. he had never been more a part of his life and work than when they traveled together during the vice-presidential years. the circumstances unchanged. now they traveled with a huge entourage of aides, security personnel and reporters and feelings toward the u.s. had hardened over the years but her husband's faith and her abilities demonstrated by his willingness to send her off by herself must have gratified her. ec's the opportunities to prove herself. her trip to peru in 1970 he penalize her value as a foreign ambassador. on may 31st, 1970, and earthquake measuring 7.75 on the richter scale devastated half of peru killing at least 50,000 people and displacing hundreds of thousands of others. mudslides followed the initial quake causing further damage. homeless, injured and starv
-line foreign policy issues including syria and iran, but also some of the others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber ducky on your catalogs that you're looking at today. >> and we appreciate that. it helps pay our salaries. [laughter] i think bob corker's going to be pretty interesting as the ranking member on foreign relations. he spent the -- he skipped the republican convention the this summer to go to the middle east, you know? and he's been doing a lot of traveling. he's super smart about these kinds of things. and i think that he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely -- like dick lieu bar, honestly. -- lugar, honestly. and he'll be against the hawk as, i think, on a number of occasions. he did a story recently about him, and we had john mccain talking about how much he respected him even though they don't always see eye to eye. but i will say this, i think that, um, the foreign relations panels in both chambers, um, you know, since i guess the '60s really have just not had as much of an impact on what the president does as they, as they used to. um, now, if kerr
especially in foreign policy. i know susan rice. i've known her a long time. she's honorable, experienced, dedicated. and i got those intelligence briefs in the morning whenever we were dealing with the crisis. >> when you were u.n. ambassador? >> when i was u.n. ambassador. you act and say what your intelligence briefing said at the time. but then those intelligence briefings change because there's an ongoing investigation of what happened in benghazi. >> she went on the five sunday talk shows five days or so after the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. and what she said was not accurate. but she insists she was just repeating what she had been briefed by the intelligence community. >> that's the information she had. and i think just apart from that, wolf, a president should have the right to nominate who he wants for secretary of state. >> but the senate has the right to confirm or reject, right? >> i know. but the candidates if it's senator kerry, susan rice, ambassador rice, two excellent candidates, i mean, i don't thin
as much oil as it does currently, perhaps for energy to be such a focal point of its foreign policy won't be so large. and already you have exactly within the oil and gas industry pushing the case for shale on the basis that it would save the country a lot of money on overseas military expenditure. >> if you take in that oil, shale gas together, how much is that revolutionizing the american economy and also the global gas and oil industry itself? >> we're already seeing some big impacts in terms of when you see home consumers shifting from diesel to heat their homes in the u.s. to gas, we've seen a lot of shifting and that's certainly impacted oil demand in the u.s. but perhaps the real game changer could be yet to come. there is a lot of talk about natural gas vehicles. we're already seeing moves on that. the figures that the iea is putting out today, these really don't take in a major shift towards natural gas as a transportation fuel. p but a lot of people in the u.s. are predicting this could happen and that's on the basis oil remains reasonably expensive and gas is very cheap. if t
agents removed items from broadwell's home. foreign policy expert michael o'hanlon has known petraeus and paula for years. >> paula's a pretty great person, a person with amazing interests in our country's security. >> reporter: broadwell, shown here in afghanistan, embedded on an intelligence mission in 2010, had unprecedented access to petraeus as she researched her book, later calling petraeus her mentor. >> as a sort of academic mentor of mine, if you will. he's proud that i've been able to do this. >> reporter: while some former aides to broadwell describe her as calculating, o'hanlon says her family life in north carolina with her husband scott and two children tell a different story. >> however big a mistake she's made and it's huge, that this is a person who worked hard, worked hard to raise her kids, worked hard to do a good job with the book. >> reporter: there is another woman deeply affected by this scandal and that's holly petraeus, general petraeus' wife of more than 30 years. petraeus' former aides tell me it is an understatement to say that she is infuriated right now.
reality. now second, there has, in fact, been a significant shift in foreign policy appetite and national security appetite, both on the part of the two parties, and on the part of the american public. and what do we mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia, and there's no appetite for a continuing to lead were in asia that we've still got in afghanistan. and we just saw in the concluded presidential campaign that the candidate who had a wing of his party clergy pledging them to take the view that we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more in syria, that we should do something militarily and iran was continually pushed away from that by the more political politically minded wing of his party that was reading an internal polling which said, there's not much difference particularly on afghanistan it when republicans and democrats. so you don't have the demand side, if you will for the kind of military spending that we've seen over the last decade. you know longer have a public outcry for military spending on this scale as a response to terroris
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
bernstein, foreign economic policy adviser to vice president biden and senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities and wilbur ross is joining in with us, too, he's sticking around because we begged him too. we'll have more from all of them in a moment. first andrew has your morning headlines. >> we've got some earnings news this morning, dow component walmart reporting third quarter profit of $1.08 per share, one cent above estimates. revenues were light and full year forecast falling below street consensus. walmart saying an internal investigation has unveiled allegations of foreign corruption practices act in three more countries, so we're going to add china, india and brazil to the list, the issue first surfaced regarding walmart's mexico operation and there was an sec -- >> i had said before the company said in the release it's been informed by the doj and sec it's been the subject of investigation into possible violations of the foreign corrupt policies act, but it's the brazil, china and india aspects that changed the story a little. >> so the earnings plus that news pu
to do mostly with foreign policy. he had a very limited press conference this summer. so this is the chance for reporters to ask him all kinds of questions that we have on our mind. i think he's going to be asked, obviously, about the fiscal cliff. i think he'll probably shy away from specifics there because he doesn't want to box himself in or out of anything as we heard jay carney said. he's definitely going to be asked about the scandal involving the generals, specifically i wonder if he'll be asked about the notification process. he really got one day notice that he was going to be losing his cia director. and then benghazi, that has happened and there hasn't been a press conference since. he'll be asked about that. and also no doubt about cabinet appointments as we hear a lot of names in the mix, zoraida. >> lots to talk at. brianna keilar, thank you so much. >>> there's a lot going on in washington including questions this morning surrounding nancy pelos pelosi's future. she is expected to announce whether she'll seek another stint at the house minority leader. she
through foreign policy magazine, tom ricks, author of "the generals." not everything that you found is necessarily that great about modern day generals today. >> before we go there, start with the model general. you say the model general was general george marshall who gave his generals a few months to succeed, die or be relieved. >> that was accountability. that was the way they worked in world war ii. you get out there and if you can't do the job, we will get rid of you. 155 division commanders in the army in world war ii. of the guys who commanded, 16 were fired. what -- it was a darwinian process. very hard-nosed, not gentle. and they moved up guys who could succeed which is why we know names today like ridgway, gavin and eisenhower. eisenhower began 1940 as lieutenant colonel, executive officer of an infantry regiment. marshall reached out and said that's who you need to be supreme allied commander. >> how did marshall rise the way he rose without going to battle. having the battle scars of world war i or world war ii. >> it was interesting. marshall didn't know him particularl
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)